Ceramics Workshop_BAFAN1B1B_Siew Guang Hong_Project 4_Diving for Pearls 2_.jpg

Siew Guang Hong

Siew Guang Hong (b. 2000) is a multidisciplinary artist primarily working with ceramics and sculpture. His practice revolves around exploring gender and sexuality. Placing special importance on sociology and beauty, Siew develops pieces centering around his study of the abject and the uncanny. To him, these fringes in aesthetics bear important connections to the marginalised queer experience in Singapore. Siew is under the TIF-SOTA Scholarship and was a previous recipient of the David Marshall Scholarship. His works have been showcased in Pulse Gallery Bangkok (2022), Another Impossibility (2022)@SOTA Gallery, TIF Virtual Emerald Auction (2021), and The Unforgetting Space (2017)@TheatreWorks.

Diving for Pearls

White stoneware, black smooth

180 x 30 x 30 cm

2021

Diving for Pearls is a collection of Siew's pitcher plant anatomy studies. Focusing on the entrance of the pitcher plant, Siew explores different ways to capture the folds, wrinkles, and flaps of the delicate pitcher orifice. Below the luscious lips, Siew moulds the voluptuous bust of the pitcher bell. The pitcher is an intriguing organism because it lures its prey into its gaping hole with sweet, seductive scents and at times, a hypnotic UV glow. One might be able to draw some connections between the ravenous hunger of the seemingly docile creature and Lacan's theory of ‘lack’. After all, the bell of the pitcher takes the form of negative space, something to be desired.

genus Scylla

Crabs, silicone, polyester, metal

100 x 37.5 x 60 cm
2022

Diving for Pearls is a collection of Siew's pitcher plant anatomy studies. Focusing on the entrance of the pitcher plant, Siew explores different ways to capture the folds, wrinkles, and flaps of the delicate pitcher orifice. Below the luscious lips, Siew moulds the voluptuous bust of the pitcher bell. The pitcher is an intriguing organism because it lures its prey into its gaping hole with sweet, seductive scents and at times, a hypnotic UV glow. One might be able to draw some connections between the ravenous hunger of the seemingly docile creature and Lacan's theory of ‘lack’. After all, the bell of the pitcher takes the form of negative space, something to be desired.